Kenneth Theodore 'Henry' Ask passed away Sept. 20, 2014. Born to Anton and Anna Ask April 29, 1929, in Forsyth, Mont. Kenneth was preceded in death by sisters, Eunice Peitz, Phyllis (Joseph) Merrill; brother, Curtis Ask; nephew, Allen Peitz; and great-niece, Gina McCurry. Survived by sister-in-law, Doris Ask; nieces, Diane (Ben) Santilli, Kay Dell (Richard) Zeman, Roxann (Doug) McCurry; nephews, Ronald (Barbara) Peitz, Bob (Mary) Ask, Mike (Teryl) Merrill and Tony Merril; and several great-nieces and -nephews. Ken grew up in Montana and Colorado, graduated in 1948 from Canon City High School. He was a great basketball player. In 1950, he went to Texas to try out for professional baseball. He said 'I gave it a hard try.' He was in the US Navy from 1950 to 1954. Went overseas in 1953 on the USS Boxer Aircraft Carrier in the Korea area. Kenneth went to Western State College and received his BA and MA. Taught school at Hellbeck from 1959 to 1968. He was principal at Eastwood, Hinsdale and Thatcher School. He retired in 1982. Kenneth loved his students and the teachers he worked with. Kenneth loved to play golf and watch sports of all kinds. He also enjoyed woodworking, making and giving away two-holers and one-holers. Kenneth served as president of Men's Club at Elmwood Golf Club for 20 years. We will miss you, Horse. Viewing, 4 to 6 p.m. Wednesday and funeral service, 10 a.m. Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014, both in the Montgomery & Steward Chapel. Interment, Roselawn Cemetery. In lieu of food and flowers memorials may be made direct to a charity of your choice. Online condolences, www.montgomerysteward.com

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  1. Mr. Ask was my sixth grade teacher at Hellbeck in 1967-68. He was one of my all time favorite teachers. He had just the right balance between discipline and teaching. We all respected him. I remember when one of the boys in the class got a guitar pick stuck in his throat and Mr. Ask picked him up like he weighed about 10 lbs. and hauled him to the nurse’s office where they were able to dislodge it. I’m sure there are tons of great stories about him. So sorry to hear of his passing. He was a great person.

  2. Mr. Ask was my sixth grade teacher at Hellbeck in 1967-68. He was one of my all time favorite teachers. He had just the right balance between discipline and teaching. We all respected him. I remember when one of the boys in the class got a guitar pick stuck in his throat and Mr. Ask picked him up like he weighed about 10 lbs. and hauled him to the nurse’s office where they were able to dislodge it. I’m sure there are tons of great stories about him. So sorry to hear of his passing. He was a great person.

  3. I only got in trouble twice in all my school years. One of those was with Mr. Ask. In fourth grade at Hellbeck 1959-60, he was our gym teacher. One of the things we would do is square dancing once a week or so. One time, I think, in the spring of 1960,Chuck Cook and I were at the back of the group, while others were learning a new square dance. He and I were not paying attention and showing each other how to wrap our legs around the back of our heads. So when it was our turn to dance, we had no idea what to do. Mr. Ask stopped the record player and had us come up on the stage in front of the whole class and wrap our heads around our legs. As a shy kid, it was one of the worst moments of my school days. But, I paid attention to whatever we were doing in gym after that episode. I ran into him in the late 1970’s and 1980’s and enjoyed the short visit. I never forgot him as I have with other teachers. I now live in the Kansas City area and got my start in the funeral business at Montgomery and Steward in 1983-84.

  4. I only got in trouble twice in all my school years. One of those was with Mr. Ask. In fourth grade at Hellbeck 1959-60, he was our gym teacher. One of the things we would do is square dancing once a week or so. One time, I think, in the spring of 1960,Chuck Cook and I were at the back of the group, while others were learning a new square dance. He and I were not paying attention and showing each other how to wrap our legs around the back of our heads. So when it was our turn to dance, we had no idea what to do. Mr. Ask stopped the record player and had us come up on the stage in front of the whole class and wrap our heads around our legs. As a shy kid, it was one of the worst moments of my school days. But, I paid attention to whatever we were doing in gym after that episode. I ran into him in the late 1970’s and 1980’s and enjoyed the short visit. I never forgot him as I have with other teachers. I now live in the Kansas City area and got my start in the funeral business at Montgomery and Steward in 1983-84.

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